«
»

Game Music

100-million-ton-no-bara-bara-sound-interview-with-hideki-sakamoto

“100 Million Ton no Bara Bara” Sound Interview with Hideki Sakamoto

Email This Post Share on Facebook “100 Million Ton no Bara Bara” Sound Interview with Hideki SakamotoTweet This Post Print This Post 12.22.09 | | 2 Comments

Want to spice up your list of New Years’ Resolutions with activities like rock climbing, torch welding, and ripping apart huge flying airships? Come February, you’ll be able to do all that on your PSP, thanks to SCEJ & Acquire’s latest collaboration. Your team needs to climb aboard an invading airship and start cutting away at that metal monstrosity, piece by piece, to send it crashing to the ground.

So what would this sky high adventure sound like? We watched the trailer video and then asked Hideki Sakamoto what that catchy song is all about. His company Noisycroak was hired to work on the game’s audio, and being the CEO has it’s benefits, like getting to pick which projects to work on himself!

Read our interview to find out how Hideki envisions the sound of 100 Million Tons.

OSV: Firstly, thank you for the opportunity to talk about your recent work for the upcoming title, 100 Million Ton no Bara Bara for the PSP.

Sakamoto: I’m very grateful you provided me with this kind of opportunity. Thank you.

OSV: When first approached about this job, were you selected personally to compose the sound, or was it assigned to the Noisycroak company in general?

Sakamoto: Initially the request came to Noisycroak. After that, when they explained the contents and design of the game to us, it was considered that the genre of music which I specialize in was the best match for this game, and so I came to be in charge of the composition.

OSV: About the theme song that plays during the 100mt trailer, what are the lyrics about, and who sings the vocals?

Sakamoto: Actually, it’s been a while for me to compose a theme song for a game. I started production thinking I wanted to convey the contents of the game through something compelling, like a voice and lyrics, and I had to make sure that it did not stray too far from the image of the music used in the game.
So I wanted to maintain the instruments I had used, and the slightly ethnic fragrance based on an Oriental Scale, and then add to that the expression through a voice, which has a limited range, making sure the music would reverberate in the hearts of all the users in a straight and simple way, with an easy-to-remember melody.

I had decided so many things I wanted to do that there were times I had no idea what the motif was going to be. It turned out to be a song that really made me feel the agony of birth. But then one time, when I was sitting in front of the keyboard, this melody string just popped into my head. It was pretty easy going from there on.

The lyrics were made by the producer of the game, Hidehito Kojima. He’s a very multi-talented man, being able to both produce a game and write song lyrics. As for the song itself, I asked a friend of mine, Naoko Koyama, someone who I have always had a lot of respect for as a musician and a singer. She accepted very pleasantly, and she will even sing the song at her future concerts.

OSV: The characters in 100mt seem to be very tiny, how did these small characters affect the sound design and instrument choices?

Sakamoto: Not just the characters, but the Battleship and the layout are really cute too, don’t you think? [Laughs]

The instruments I used in the game this time include the trumpet, trombone, bass trombone, tenor sax, baritone sax, clarinet, snare drum, bass drum, timpani and lots of ethnic instruments like the sitar. The characters in this game scurry about at their hearts’ content on top of this battleship, so I wanted to express appropriately speedy and minute movements through the sax and clarinet, both instruments that excel in quick phrases. The large and heavy movement of the battleship on the other hand, I wanted to express with a sound of worn metal, so I made use of the trumpet and trombone, instruments that firmly support the basis of the song.

OSV: The music almost sounds like it is being played by kids’ toy instruments, was that style chosen to give a more playful or innocent tone?

Sakamoto: Actually, the performances were handled by veteran brass and woodwind players. This has been another quite difficult score for us [smiling wryly] and we had trouble finding people who could handle the performance… so the instruments we used are all completely identical to those used by professional orchestra and jazz players.

But I had envisioned a consistent image of “fussy and hurried, but still fun,” so if the music comes across as being ‘innocent,’ I think that’s because of how it has been arranged.

As for the direction we decided to go in, at the very first meeting Mr. Terajima, who’s in charge of the battleship design, gave me a CD and said “What do you think of this?” and that was the start of it. The CD was focused on brass instruments, but the performance was crude and rough. But it had a very distinct flavor. I really liked what I was hearing so I decided to go with it immediately. I remember thinking at that exact moment “This is what I’m gonna do!”

OSV: Do other songs in the game follow the same playful mood as the trailer music, or are there other dramatic styles as the story progresses?

Sakamoto: The theme song we used for the trailer is very memorable and catchy, but the music used in the actual game is a lot more like background music. Because I always focus most on melody when composing, there isn’t a single melody-less song in here, but contrary to the theme song which was made to convey the contents of the game in an easy-to-understand way, I decided to create the in-game music in such a way that the player would become more absorbed in the game.

So for battle scenes I obviously chose lively and dynamic songs, and for happy, sad, scary and funny events I created several appropriate songs to set the mood. And of course, as you progress in the game, the music will become more exciting, and especially the ending theme is something I ended up really enjoying, so please do your best to finish the game!

OSV: Did you utilize any live instrument recordings of your own, or was the music done entirely with synth and samples?

Sakamoto: As I stated before, most of the instruments are live. I only used synth sound sparingly. So I had to create sheet music for every single song in the game.

In general, the group of brass instruments contains what are called “transposing instruments.” For instance in this case, the trumpet, sax and clarinet. Put in very simple terms, this means that these instruments, when it says “do” on the sheet music, do not in fact produce the note “do.” To explain why this is so would take too long, but what it boils down to is that when it came to writing the sheet music my head felt like it was going to explode. I’m used to it by now though.

Also, with brass instruments you have to take the breathing into account. As an extreme example, telling someone to hold the same note for 5 minutes straight is completely impossible. What can easily be accomplished by a synthesizer can be impossible to pull off with live instruments. I believe that it is that kind of restriction that plays a very important part in the expression of music. I spend a lot of time and effort on recording, because I want to achieve that restricted expression.

OSV: Approximately how many peices of music did you write for this title? Was it a long challenge or did the inspiration come naturally?

Sakamoto: Including the theme song, I made 25 different pieces. I composed and arranged all of them myself, but everything apart from the theme song went pretty quickly. I think it took me about one week in total for the entire soundtrack.

Composing music is something that is very hard to plan in terms of time though. There’s cases like this where each piece takes anywhere between several dozen minutes and several hours, and then there’s cases where it could take months.

Maybe this is just me, but I tend to be satisfied with the pieces I make really quickly. On the other hand, those that take me way too much time end up sounding annoying or preachy or otherwise just not very good. Of course that does not include bigger pieces of several dozen minutes. In that respect I am very satisfied with the music I made for this game.

OSV: Well, we want to thank you for sharing your thoughts with us, Sakamoto-san.  It’s been great to learn more about the sound of 100mt, and we wish you continued success.  Thank you very much.

Sakamoto: Thank you! When this game is released in Japan it is actually relatively closely followed by the release of another game I scored: Holy Invasion of Privacy, Badman: 3D, so please check that out too.

Thank you for providing me with this precious opportunity.  I will keep on studying the truth of music in the world of video games, so please keep rooting for me!

100 Million Ton no Bara Bara Official Website:
http://www.jp.playstation.com/scej/title/100mt/

Noisycroak Corporation Official Website:
http://noisycroak.co.jp/

Interview by Carl Larson of Moonraiser Media LLC
Translations by Justin Pfeiffer of OSV and Tim van Ingen.
Photos provided by Hideki Sakamoto of Noisycroak Inc.

OSV:まず最初に、この際、PSPの「100万トンのバラバラ」におかかわりになったことについてお話していただいて、ありがとうございます。

坂本:こちらこそ、このような機会を設けていただきまして感謝しております。ありがとうございます。

OSV:坂本さんはこの仕事をどのようにして受け取られましたか。メーカーから個人的に選ばれましたか。それとも、その依頼がNoisycroakに(集団として)宛がわれましたか。

坂本:最初の依頼はNoisycroakにいただきました。そののちゲームの内容やデザインなどのご説明をいただく中で、私が得意とするジャンルの音楽がもっともこのゲームにマッチすると思うにいたりまして、私が担当させていただくことになりました。

OSV:「100万トンのバラバラ」のトレーラー(予告)が流れる間のイメージボーカルなのですが、その歌詞の内容について少し教えていただけますか。歌っている方は誰ですか。

坂本:今回、私としては久しぶりに主題歌の制作に取り組みました。声、そして歌詞という訴求性のあるものを通してゲームの内容をわかりやすく伝えたい、というコンセプトで制作を開始したので、ゲームの中の楽曲イメージと隔たりがあってはいけないわけです。つまり使用した楽器であるとか、オリエンタル音階を基本とした民族的な香りのする旋法はそのままに、音域の制限された声というものでの表現にくわえ、覚えやすいメロディーでわかりやすくストレートにユーザーの皆さんの心に響かなければいけない…。そんな色々な自分なりの決めごとをいくつも作っていたらまったく曲想が思い浮かばなくなってしまった時期もありました。久しぶりに生みの苦しみを味わった一曲となりました。ところがある時、鍵盤の前でふっとこのサビのメロディを思いついてしまったんですよ。そこから完成までは早かったですね。

実は作詞は本作品のプロデューサーである小島英士(コジマ ヒデヒト)さんによるものです。プロデューサー自ら作詞なんて多才ですよね。歌は私の友人で、ミュージシャンとして歌手として、かねてより尊敬していたコヤマナオコさんにお願いしました。とっても快くお引き受けいただいて、今後コヤマさんのコンサートでも歌っていただけることになっているんですよ。

OSV:「100万トンのバラバラ」におけるキャラクターはとてもちっちゃいですね。そのキャラクターはどのように曲調や選ばれた楽器に影響を与えましたか。

坂本:キャラクターもですが、戦艦やレイアウトのデザインもとっても可愛いですよね(笑)。

今回ゲーム中の楽曲で使用した楽器はトランペット、トロンボーン、バストロンボーン、テナーサックス、バリトンサックス、クラリネット、スネアドラム、グランカッサ、ティンパニそしてシタールをはじめとする民族楽器をもろもろです。キャラクターはゲーム中ちょこまかと戦艦の上を縦横無尽に走りまくるのですが、そういったスピーディで細かな動きの表現は速いフレーズの演奏が得意なサックスとクラリネットに担当してもらい、逆に戦艦の大きさや重さ、使い古された感じの色合いであるとか金属質な材質などは、楽曲の根幹をしっかりと支えているトランペットとトロンボーンの音色や奏法によって表現しました。

OSV:「100万トンのバラバラ」の音楽は子供のおもちゃ的な楽器で演奏されているように聞こえますが、そのスタイルを選ばれたのはなぜでしょうか。より気軽で無邪気な雰囲気があるようにされたわけですか。

坂本:演奏は実はベテランの金管・木管楽器奏者の方々にお願いしたんですね。例によって今回もかなり難しいスコアになりましたので(苦笑)、なかなか吹きこなせる人がいなくて…。ですので楽曲に使われている楽器はオーケストラやジャズでプロが使うものとまったく同じものです。ただ、私の構想の中で「せわしなく、あわただしくて、でも楽しい」というイメージが一貫してありましたので、無邪気な雰囲気に聞こえるとすれば、それは楽曲のアレンジによるものだと思います。

楽曲の方向性については、一番最初の打ち合わせのときに、今回戦艦のデザインを担当されている寺島さんから「こんな感じ…どうですか?」とCDを渡されたのが最初です。金管楽器中心のCDだったんですが、演奏が雑で乱暴なんですよ。でもとっても味がある。その感じがとってもよくて、一発で気に入ってしまいました。その場でこの方向性で行こう!と決まったのを覚えています。

OSV:BGMについて少し教えてください。トレーラー曲が成立された気軽な感じが続きますか。ゲームの進行につれてもっとドラマチックな(力強く朗々と響く)曲が出てきますか。

坂本:トレーラーで使用された主題歌はとても覚えやすくキャッチーな曲となっていますが、ゲームの中の楽曲はよりバックグラウンドミュージックの色合いが強いです。

私が楽曲を制作するときに一番重視しているのはメロディなので完全にメロディレスの楽曲はありませんが、主題歌がゲームの内容をわかりやすく伝えるという目的であるのに対し、ゲーム内の楽曲はよりユーザーがゲームに夢中になれるような演出のひとつとして制作しています。ですので戦闘時の派手で動きのある楽曲はもちろんのこと、楽しい、悲しい、怖い、面白いなどなど、イベントを彩る様々な心象描写を受け持つ楽曲もご用意しています。もちろんゲームの進行にしたがって楽曲も盛り上がっていきますし、エンディングの曲もとっても気に入っていますのでぜひ頑張ってゲームをクリアして欲しいです!

OSV:このゲームの音楽において何かの生演奏の録音を利用されましたか。それとも、全てシンセサイザー音源で作られましたか。

坂本:前述のとおり、ほとんどの楽器は生演奏です。シンセサイザー音源は部分的に使用した程度です。ですので全曲に対して楽譜を用意する必要がありました。

一般的に、管楽器の中には移調楽器というものがあります。たとえば今回ですとトランペット、サックス、クラリネットなんですが、これらの楽器は、すごくかみ砕いて言えば、譜面にドと書いても演奏の時にドの音じゃない違う音が出るんですね。どうしてそんな決まりごとがあるのかは長くなるので割愛しますが、譜面を書くときに頭がこんがらがりそうになるんですよ。さすがにもう慣れましたけど。

あと管楽器で留意しなければいけないのは「息継ぎ」です。極端な話を言えば「同じ音を5分間ずっと吹き続けてください」というお願いは現実的には無理なわけです。シンセサイザーであれば簡単に表現できることが生楽器の場合はそうはいかない。その不自由さが音楽の表現においてとっても大事なことだと私は思ってるんですね。そうした不自由な表現を手に入れたいがためにあえて時間とコストを掛けてレコーディングをするというわけなんです。

OSV:坂本さんはこのスコアでだいたい何曲ぐらい作られましたか。それは、どうでしたか。インスピレーションが自然に出てきましたか。それとも逆に、長い挑戦でしたか。

坂本:主題歌もふくめて全部で25曲制作しました。すべて私の作曲・編曲によるものですが、主題歌以外の制作は早かったです。全曲あわせて合計で一週間くらいだったでしょうか。

作曲っていうのは本当に時間が読めない作業なんですね。今作のように一曲数十分~数時間で完成してしまうこともあれば、何ヶ月もかかることもあります。

これは私に限ったことかもしれませんが、あっという間に完成した曲というのは、自分でも満足のいく曲が多い。逆にやたら時間の掛かった曲は、中身がくどかったり説明臭いものになってしまったりであまり良いものになっていない気がするんです。もちろん一曲数十分というような大作は別にして、ですね。そういう意味でも今作の楽曲には大変満足しています。

OSV:いろいろなお思いを教えてくださって本当にありがとうございました。「100万トンのバラバラ」のサウンドをより深く存じてうれしく思っております。坂本さんの成功が続くように祈ります。

坂本:ありがとうございます!
日本では、今作のリリース日と比較的近い時期に、同じく私が楽曲を制作した「勇者のくせになまいきだ:3D」もリリースされますので、あわせてご注目いただければとても嬉しいです。

この度は貴重な機会をいただきまして誠にありがとうございました。
今後も音楽の真理を追究しながらゲームというメディアで頑張りたいと思いますので応援よろしくお願いいたします!

100 Million Ton no Bara Bara Official Website:
http://www.jp.playstation.com/scej/title/100mt/

Noisycroak Corporation Official Website:
http://noisycroak.co.jp/

Interview by Carl Larson of Moonraiser Media LLC
Translations by Justin Pfeiffer of OSV and Tim van Ingen.
Photos provided by Hideki Sakamoto of Noisycroak Inc.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

We like it when you talk to us

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. Subscribe to these comments.

No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

:

:


«
»